NEW CREATION SILKSCREEN PRINTS

The Waterfall Mansion & Gallery is proud to introduce a collaboration between two master artists, Makoto Fujimura and Gary Lichtenstein, in creating a new silkscreen print project. This project aims to correct our perception of each artwork as a mere commodity and the neglect of the importance of the human flourishing aspect of living artists.

This video shows a glimpse of the process for Silkscreen project “Golden Sea-Hope” (malachite, cinnabar, and oyster white).

Waterfall has been working to develop a more sustainable and generative financial platform for living artists by emphasizing their creative capital and life stories as critical essence of society. We uniquely see art to create cultural capital as a gift to society and therefore significant real estate value.

Gary Lichtenstein and Makoto Fujimura are working closely to use original selected paintings as a road map to create a brand new series of works. The authentic practice of each silkscreen print is still done entirely by hand and these unique prints will also feature applications of gold leaf, gold powder, iridescence and diamond dust.

Due to very limited editions, please email us directly to pre-reserve prints if you are interested in collecting:

Jiwon Song Artist Management

Jiwon@waterfallmansion.com


“Golden Sea-Hope”

Malachite, Cinnabar and Oyster White

 My new series of museum quality silkscreen prints will be produced in collaboration with master printer, Gary Lichtenstein, at his studio inside Jersey City’s spectacular Mana Contemporary. The limited edition prints of “Golden Sea”, “Walking on Water - Banquo’s Dream” and “Charis-Kairos (The Tears of Christ)” use the original paintings as a road map to create a brand new series of works. The authen- tic practice of silkscreen is still done entirely by hand and these unique prints will also feature applications of gold leaf, gold pow- der, iridescence and diamond dust. I have admired Gary’s work for some time, notably the editions produced with artists including Marina Abramovic, Robert Indiana, Alfred Leslie and James Prosek. I was delighted to be introduced by Kate Shin of Waterfall Mansion Gallery and I look forward to the new creations.   By Makoto Fujimura

My new series of museum quality silkscreen prints will be produced in collaboration with master printer, Gary Lichtenstein, at his studio inside Jersey City’s spectacular Mana Contemporary. The limited edition prints of “Golden Sea”, “Walking on Water - Banquo’s Dream” and “Charis-Kairos (The Tears of Christ)” use the original paintings as a road map to create a brand new series of works. The authen- tic practice of silkscreen is still done entirely by hand and these unique prints will also feature applications of gold leaf, gold pow- der, iridescence and diamond dust. I have admired Gary’s work for some time, notably the editions produced with artists including Marina Abramovic, Robert Indiana, Alfred Leslie and James Prosek. I was delighted to be introduced by Kate Shin of Waterfall Mansion Gallery and I look forward to the new creations.

By Makoto Fujimura

 
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MAKOTO FUJIMURA

Makoto Fujimura’s work is represented by Artrue International and has been exhibited at galleries around the world, including Sato Museum in Tokyo, The Contemporary Museum of Tokyo, Tokyo University of Fine Arts Muse- um, Dillon Gallery, Bentley Gallery in Arizona, Gallery Exit and Oxford House at Taikoo Place in Hong Kong, Museum of the Bible, Tikotin Museum in Israel and Vienna’s Belve- dere Museum.

Fujimura founded the International Arts Movement in 1992, and Fujimura Institute in 2011. He was recently ap- pointed Director of Fuller’s Brehm Center, and is an art- ist, writer, and speaker who is recognized worldwide as a cultural shaper. A Presidential appointee to the National Council on the Arts from 2003-2009, Fujimura served as an international advocate for the arts, speaking with de- cision makers and advising governmental policies on the arts. In 2014, the American Academy of Religion named Makoto Fujimura as its ’2014 Religion and the Arts’ award recipient.

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GARY LICHTENSTEIN

Renowned painter Gary Lichtenstein demonstrates true abstract expressionism via his spectacular use of color. His paintings, more than 200 oil-based works to date, exhibit mastery of the properties of light absorption and reflection, specifically with regard to the visual impact of color. Inspired by artists such as Robert Motherwell and Helen Frankenthaler, Lichtenstein creates canvas- es which have frequently been described as ethereal, and he has been praised as one who manages to capture a “sense of no-self...” In fact, the composition of Lichtenstein’s work has been referred to as atmospheric... “evocative of natural forms and phenomena.” In addition, Lichtenstein has collaborated with over ninety artists during the course of his thirty-five year career.


 

GOLDEN SEA

 
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Golden Sea, 2011
Mineral Pigments and Gold on Kumohada 80x64 in.
Collection of Roberta and Howard Ahmanson

Golden Sea is a retrospective monograph of my career, and yet it is also about one painting...Golden Sea also borrows its gold transfer technique from my mentor and professor Matazo Kayama (1927-2004), whose lineage of Rimpa tradition I carry with me even though I am an American working in New York City and Princeton...It was Kayama-sen- sei who imbued in me the ‘third color’ of gold and silver particularly the idea that Japanese metal leafs, because they are so thin, can be transferred like monotypes. The ‘secret ingredient’ behind the Golden Sea transfer of gold is a Japanese hand woven silk which is made in a strict traditional manner but is no longer produced today. There- fore, Golden Sea is a homage to and a lament for dying traditions, as well as an expression of the sublimity inherent in precious materials.”

 
  GOLDEN SEA : RED Silkscreen Print with gold leaf and gold powder    12 Total Editions  Image Size: 25 1⁄2 x 32 inches (vertical)   **Three as set: 10% discount shall be applied **Color red may appear darker on print

GOLDEN SEA : RED
Silkscreen Print with gold leaf and gold powder

12 Total Editions
Image Size: 25 1⁄2 x 32 inches (vertical)

**Three as set: 10% discount shall be applied **Color red may appear darker on print

 
  GOLDEN SEA : BLUE Silkscreen Print with gold leaf and gold powder    12 Total Editions  Image Size: 25 1⁄2 x 32 inches (vertical)

GOLDEN SEA : BLUE
Silkscreen Print with gold leaf and gold powder

12 Total Editions
Image Size: 25 1⁄2 x 32 inches (vertical)

 
  GOLDEN SEA : WHITE Silkscreen Print with gold leaf, gold powder and oyster shell powder    12 Total  e ditions   Image Size: 25 1⁄2 x 32 inches (vertical)   **Three as set: 10% discount shall be applied

GOLDEN SEA : WHITE
Silkscreen Print with gold leaf, gold powder and oyster shell powder

12 Total editions

Image Size: 25 1⁄2 x 32 inches (vertical)

**Three as set: 10% discount shall be applied

 

CHARIS-KAIROS

THE TEARS OF CHRIST

Charis-Kairos (The Tears of Christ), 2010
Mineral Pigments and Gold on Belgian Linen
80 x 64 in.
Four Holy Gospels, Commissioned by Crossway

Makoto Fujimura was commissioned by Crossway to do the first-ever abstract illumina- tions of the four Gospels, celebrating the 400th anniversary of the King James translation of the Scriptures. Drawing upon the medieval tradition of illumination, which has not been professionally conducted in 500 years. Fujimura’s Four Holy Gospels exhibit has traveled around the United States and in Japan, including a show at the Museum of Biblical Art (Mo- BIA) in New York City (2011). The illuminated Gospels were featured as one of 36 pieces at the World Youth Day (2011), a contemporary art exhibit for Pope Benedict XVI’s visit to Ma- drid; Fujimura was the only artist chosen to exhibit more than one piece (he featured three).

For one-and-a-half years Fujimura labored on the Crossway commission by returning to the medieval process of illuminating manuscripts. Some of the earliest Christian scribes sought to pictorially depict the Bible because of societal illiteracy, providing a way for the viewer to engage in a kind of “visual exegesis” of the Scriptures by way of images. Used as an aid in worship, these images provided a kind of “gloss,” expanding the narrative of the text by imagining the story through images. In essence, it is, as John 1:14 states, “the Word made flesh.” Thinking back to the Lindisfarne Gospels (8th century) and Book of Kells (9th century), as well as William Blake;s illustrations of the Bible (18-19th centuries), Fujimura incorporated the historical tradition of embellishing the Scriptures with his own execution of trans-modern” abstraction using Japanese Nihonga, employing gold and sil- ver in a symbolic manner parallel to the medieval scribe. Whereas medieval illuminations were depicted on a codex of bound vellum, Fujimura created five large-scale paintings (a frontispiece and one for each of the four Gospels), eighty-nine capital letters for each chapter, and more than seventy embellishments per two-page spread in the printed book.

 
  CHARIS-KAIROS  (THE TEARS OF CHRIST)   Silkscreen Print with gold leaf and gold powder    36 Total Editions   Image Size: 22 x 27 1⁄2 inches (vertical)

CHARIS-KAIROS (THE TEARS OF CHRIST)

Silkscreen Print with gold leaf and gold powder

36 Total Editions

Image Size: 22 x 27 1⁄2 inches (vertical)

  CHARIS-KAIROS   (THE TEARS OF CHRIST)   Silkscreen Print with gold leaf and gold powder    6 Total Editions with Diamond Dust   Image Size: 22 x 27 1⁄2 inches (vertical)    **Diamond dust will be applied to the tear part of the silkscreen

CHARIS-KAIROS

(THE TEARS OF CHRIST)

Silkscreen Print with gold leaf and gold powder

6 Total Editions with Diamond Dust

Image Size: 22 x 27 1⁄2 inches (vertical)

**Diamond dust will be applied to the tear part of the silkscreen


 

Due to very limited editions, please email us directly to pre-reserve prints if you are interested in collecting:

Jiwon Song Artist Management

Jiwon@waterfallmansion.com

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